VivaMalta - The Free Speech Forum - FT - On the Role of Automation

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
May 24, 2017, 05:28:29 PM

Home Help Search Login Register
+  VivaMalta - The Free Speech Forum
|-+  Imperivm Evropa
| |-+  Dominium
| | |-+  FT - On the Role of Automation
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: FT - On the Role of Automation  (Read 1602 times)
shadow cup
James Cauchi
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2331

« on: December 08, 2006, 07:26:20 PM »

Welcome. This is a segment and forms a part of the Fuzzy Time series. For a look at a full range of the topics dealt with kindly visit "Fuzzy Time - Fragments of an Ideology"

I look forward to reading any feedback that you may have but I request that you kindly place any general or non-contributory comments in the "General Discussion" thread.

-----

On the Role of Automation


Since time immemorable the human race had existed in a labour-intensive culture. The men spent time hunting, gathering lumber or, when civilization turned to agriculture, tended the fields or fashioned tools to lessen the burden upon their daily lives while the women helped in the fields and took care of the homestead and the men. Racking up an existence was a job that took up a significant portion of the day.

Then came the industrial revolution - the advent of the machine and other technologies and, long story short, today we live in an age when things happen much faster than a couple of hundred years ago.

Now one would expect that this revelation would have eased the burden upon the individual by a great factor... and it did... but humanity negatively compensated through the ambitious rat race syndrome that we have been programmed from a young age to believe... that idle time is wasted time.

-----

We could do a lot better. Even by today's standard of technology it is my firm belief that we could sustain ourselves quite comfortably by shedding a few hours from the notorious 40 hour work-week. We are told that the reason that this is not done is that it would make us less efficient.  
This argument may hold some water in economic terms in that it may provide an edge to competing nations, but is quite disputable even on an economic level. It is my belief that shedding 5 hours would create enough jobs to more than accommodate our current unemployment figure (keeping in mind that the EU average is around 10%)... which, from the economic point of view, would entail less unemployment benefits, in itself already putting the country a fair step ahead.

But even so, one has to wonder why we suffer from this disease of production for production's sake. Sure... supply is needed to meet demand but are we not also told that Human wants are insatiable? Is the current system even credible (let alone the best humanity has to offer) as a means of providing a high standard of life?

-----

Taking this a step forward one has to ask oneself a few very fundamental questions. "What is one's purpose in life? Where is one heading? How will one get to where one is heading?"  

Focusing upon the last of these three questions one would be forgiven for starting to make abstract plans of how one will do this and build up for that in our free time (unless one's goals are purely work-related i.e.)... But what I am talking about is not the big concepts but rather the more basic things in life.

A full-timer typically works roughly as many hours in the day than they sleep, each taking up some 7-9 hours of the day. This leaves 6-10 hours of the day to 'live' but don't forget to deduct a couple of more hours investment towards tasks of utility like traveling to and from work, eating, a shower, cooking and such. Indeed, if one were to live alone then one would also have to factor shopping, cleaning of living space, clothes and dishes, ironing and all other little things into it...

The time one actually 'lives' is growing shorter isn't it? I'm not even a person best qualified to comment upon such since I have not experienced such... but I have a pretty decent imagination. Assuming that one still manages to find 2 hours to oneself each day and a full 12 hours on weekends then one ultimately has a budget of 34 or so hours in a 144 hour period (or approximately 24% of every living moment) to actually live your lives (assuming that you are a single full-timer). You effectively spend more time sleeping than living!

-----

No... this is not the way life was supposed to be. Humans were never intended to slave their lives for a minimum wage that barely affords them a half-decent living space of their own in a 20 year period (of 10 years if you somehow manage not to spend a single cent of your hard-earned money - you would likely suffer in other ways regardless 9_9).

One might suggest that I am deliberately looking at a worst case scenario - that I deliberately ignore the middle to higher classes, wage-wise. Indeed one could play the averages game and suggest that Maltese make a half-decent living... but this is not the whole story. As with any exercise in wage comparison one would find that for every person earning above the wage average there would be several others who earn less than average. Even for persons of 'average' earnings one may find that they work substantially longer hours - the maltese self-employed and lower professional classes are no strangers to the 48 or 60+ hour working weeks. It is all a matter of perspectives and statistics tend to be a classic case of selective information.

-----

Automation is the way forward ladies and gentlemen. It is the
concept that machines in their most basic of forms are exquisitely-formed tools that are able to perform humanity's bidding at a few hundred thousand or million key-presses (let one not devalue the sterling work of the many undervalued programmers of this world).

Through the automated manufacture of goods one would be able to alleviate the mundane burdens of living from the humans and allow humanity to delve into more 'beautiful' pursuits such as the arts, crafts, technological creation, research, music and more.

One should also draw upon resources of abundance in order to set up the proverbial life-line for civil, intellectual, emotional, social, cultural, administrative and survivalist (amongst others) liberation of the races.

-----

Power to (Water and Machine) to (Food and Manufacture)

We have the technology for a radical breakthrough in the administration and purpose of our Manufacturing capabilities as well as our stocking ideologies.

We have the power at our fingertips... We have the motivation dormant within our hearts and we have the logical capacity just waiting for a paradigm to embrace. Do we have the courage to take that essential first step? Time will tell.
Report to moderator   Logged
Placed by Circumstance - Seeker by Design - Philosopher by Choice - Path Forger by Destiny...
 \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' [/CO
shadow cup
James Cauchi
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2331

« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2006, 07:29:36 PM »

The merging of steel, silicon & human ingenuity - The next revolution

When you think about it the machines that took over the jobs of thousands really weren't all that smart or even all that versatile. We recall the giant mechanical arms that worked away at welding semi-finished products and the like. Variants of these are still in use today and tend to be comparably large.

(IMPERIUM: - True. Ever more sophisticated robotics are needed. Our modern slaves. We do not need immigration: Africans infesting us on the pretext that we need them, otherwise the economy slumps. Robotics replacing Ruandians.)

So what is keeping humanity from relatively easing off and letting the machine take over the toil? Perhaps it has something to do with the almost infinite variety of tasks that a machine needs to be able to do before hoping to fully replace human intervention... or perhaps it has something to do with a leadership intent on seeing humanity slave on, knowing that without work to distract the individuals from their true ambitions control may be lost.

(IMPERIUM: - Correct! Read my Credo and see that the 40 hour week should have been progressively reduced years ago. The unions, those dodos and the capitalists never wanted that. Their aim is to keep the sheep in their pens. Only thus can they remain in political/economic control.)

-----

I believe that the way forward is to invest no longer in robots capable of specific or limited ranges of tasks but rather invest in robots possessing maximum flexibility in the ease with which they can be programmed to perform a near-infinite range of tasks.

(IMPERIUM: - This is being done, slowly. The printing of books come to mind. Now we have tailored printing: adjusting supply with demand. Books are no longer printed in great numbers, awaiting sales.)

From there one can invest in a master network of factories covering virtually the entire spectrum of manufacturable services. Products would abound but a strict limiting stock policy would be in place to allow, for example, 50 refrigerators of a particular type to be stocked at any one time, reducing or increasing as the flow of demand fluctuates. The same machines would be creating computer components in one half-hour period and stationary the next.

(IMPERIUM: - Correct! Versatile and flexible supply will keep up with actual and expected demand. The internet of course, will be the link between the two.)

Minimum waste and sane stocking... the closest one could come to on-demand production as one can get.

(IMPERIUM: - Yes. Environmentally friendly production. No dumping.)

It is then that humanity would be a step closer to shedding the shackles of mundane labour and instead focus upon their dreams.

(IMPERIUM: - From masticating bisons: to Higher Forms of Life: to Supermen.

Imperium
0608
)

-----

Marco Polo: - You see, great 'out of the box' thinking
Report to moderator   Logged
Placed by Circumstance - Seeker by Design - Philosopher by Choice - Path Forger by Destiny...
 \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' [/CO
shadow cup
James Cauchi
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2331

« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2006, 07:45:57 PM »

The aftermath of automation - and a discussion

Ok... lets say that we do manage to make the break-through in technology management happen and find that 90%+ of all mundane processes are taken over by our creations. Now what?

The people would find themselves idle without some kind of redirective force to take up their time. How might such a society develop?

Firstly however, let us take a look at what sort of job tasks would likely remain for humans.

Industrial Maintenance managers would exist to ensure that the robots designated for diagnosing and repairing flaws in each other are in good repair and that resources for such are not lacking.

Industrial Resource managers would exist to ensure that stockpiles of raw materials do not run low.

Stock Keepers would exist to ensure that stockpiles of finished products are in order.

Industrial Quality managers would exist to ensure that products off the line and passing the diagnostic pre-scans are actually up to standards for the product (as a side-note industry would slide towards the creation of quality products of a long-life rather than the rubbish we see in our markets today).

Real Time managers would exist to ensure that production runs progress in a timely manner (the key word here is a comfortable pace over a hectic pace).

Industrial programmers would exist to program the robotics through use a comprehensive library of pre-programmed tasks to facilitate the creation of new products

Data Maintenance managers would exist to ensure that records of products are orderly kept and backed up at regular periods. They would also deal with data retrieval operations.

Harmonial Analysts would exist to compare records of different departments to ensure that they match up (If two computers are sold then only two computers should be removed from warehouse stockpiles).

That was just in industry, although I am sure that there would be room for more positions such as security personnel and the sort.

-----

More importantly humanity could focus more upon the fields of administration and security, social interaction, innovation and artistic expression...

Fields that are suitable for persons of all ages of maturity.

-----

Once the field of industrial robotics has been mastered (on all levels, including nanotechnology) the nation (regardless of which one) would have a collective boon on their hands. An industrial labour market of relatively very low cost producing products of high quality for consumption.

Another question here is how does one distribute such a boon? Lets say that we are looking a few generations down the line. The citizenry would no longer have been directly involved in setting the sytem up. Where would the profits go? How much profit would be involved and considered fair?

Lets say that somebody comes up with a new laptop computer setup and would like the product to be marketed. Let us also presume that the initial online scrutiny by the peers are passed (a demomeritocratic expression of opinions and that this product becomes available (stocked in near-finished condition so as to allow for personalization and customization)).

In determining the price of an item one would naturally feel that the cost of creation would need to be included in full.  
And then what? The innovator (the innovation of a product is a factor by which it shall be judged) deserves a portion of the profits made upon any given product and hence such profit margins should be added on. Lets say that it is a variable percentage depending upon the innovative effort of a product. A significantly innovative product may garner 10% while a less innovative product may garner 3% for the innovator. Products of no innovative worth would not hit the market unless they feature improvements upon existing technologies.

There is also the possibility of adding on a consumption tax based upon the cost of disposal at the end of its useful life. Other factors in such a scenario is price reductions based upon the worth of recycled materials.

The list goes on and on... but it would be to our detriment to ignore the possibilities of the society created, a more adventurous and caring society no longer deadened by the burden of a 40 hour plight upon ones' lives.

The future at the top of the flight of steps is brilliant but the steps need to be climbed in order to get closer to the light. All that remains is for us to shed the blinkers of power fossilization.

-----

(Marco Polo: - Machines can not do what people do. people create. imagine people free to create and machines are the slaves.)

(shadow cup: - Well... machines 'can' do a lot of what people do... on the physical and analytical levels. Machines can be pseudo-creative also if provided with a few paradigms to base off of.)

(Marco Polo: - But can they do 'out of the box' thinking? if they have parameters that they must adhere to they are limited. if they do not have parameters what is stopping them taking over?)

(shadow cup: - No - that is why I mentioned human-made paradigms. :c) Although it might be possible for a machine to be pseudo-evolutional in development... In a way fractal sound technologies are already doing something tiny in this direction.

I hesitate to refer to machines as slaves however. Yes they are serving humanity but the term slave is generally perceived as a derogatory term. I prefer to call them worker robots.)

(Marco Polo: - I refer to them as slaves as most people have a socialist mentality these days and do not think of them as tools but as competitors. they do not see them as liberators. I love the fact that pc lets me do tasks that would take me forever to do manually.)

(shadow cup: - The reason why I choose not to refer to them as slaves is simply because some habits are hard to break once set. If a self-aware machine were to be achieved one should not provide valid reasons for robotic rebellions. :cP

They work for everybody worthy of their labour. If the socialist mentality finds it hard to digest then one should feed the concept slowly, not rename it ^_^)

(Marco Polo: - I have always been a defender of these tools but many people will always possess a fear. some people are scared stiff of touching a pc.)

(shadow cup: - I cannot blame them. They see computers as formidable items that they cannot understand - it is alien to their pre-80s mentality.

Plus it has Bill Gate's cologne smothered all over it so again I cannot blame them. ^_~ That is why Macintosh is the computer developer of the near future in my view

I guess there is also a slight element of fear of humanity going as far as to create androids of pseudo-intelligence and pseudo-emotional states. Why not prepare for such a potential eventuality from now through provision of a non-prejudiced environment? ^_^)

(Marco Polo: - These future people would be able to use their talents in advancing society instead of doing the same tasks everyday.  

As more machines are created, more people are freed up to do things that machines simply cannot do. why should there be a welder welding when a robot can do the job? Wouldn?t the welder be better suited to a job that requires more thought?

imagine humanoid robots picking up our garbage and instead of those people wasted on such a task they can be learning.

(shadow cup: - I fully concur. Mundane tasks are tasks that a machine can do without complaint. For as long as they are not self-aware they are effectively glorified tools distantly related to the spanner. ;c) In the case of androids the boundaries become fuzzy... one would best treat them in almost the same way as humans in terms of respect as they would be motivated to work hand-in-hand with humans in assisting them to achieve their ambitions. I am thinking of movies such as the Terminator series, iRobot and Bicentinial Man in saying this. ^_^)

(Marco Polo: - Spanner, yes indeed. Like I said, many will still see them as a threat.

Granted, not everyone is a creative genius but I am sure they can perform tasks that machines cannot do thus freeing up the more intelligent and allowing them to create.)

(shadow cup: - That is why I believe in an inclusive society that progresses in as natural, or organic, a fashion as possible. One doesn't have to be a genius to be a receptionist or a waiter or a butler or a secretarial clerk or such.)

(Marco Polo: - Too many jobs exist that robot slaves can do. people should have free minds. a single idea can change the world.)

(shadow cup: - I agree. And the more we humans are enslaved into the grinder that is the economy, the more ideas will blossom only to die out before they see the light of day... merely because we don't have the time for 'foolishness'.

The human perspective will change... and the vision needs to keep the arms open wide to appeal to as many as possible. It is ok to show the out-held palm to those deemed undesirable but it would be ideal to base such upon rational perspectives, solid reasoning and a healthy sense of justice.)

(Marco Polo: - As I said above though, many see them as competitors and not tools. one only has to think of Mintoff and his pc phobia.)

(shadow cup: - Mintoff is 90 now... which means he was born in before the second world war and probably before the telephone had established itself. ;c) He was not brought up with computers and hence he is not the best example. ^_^)

-----

(Marco Polo: - I am in a mood for rambling here so let me give a few job examples and how they can be freed up (if possible)

Waiter/restaurants

I am sure we could all tolerate an automated Mc Donalds with a single staff member managing an entirely automated system. Each area of restaurants would have a team of engineers to make sure the automated system works smoothly.)

(shadow cup: - I believe that McDonalds and such businesses based on 'grabbing a bite' should be remodeled into a glorified vending machine. ;c) Such vending machines could serve as a convenient snack if in a hurry or such. Freezing equipment would ensure that ingredients do not lose their integrity and stocks could be remotely monitored through attachment to the world wide web. There automation has been almost completed - the next step is automated restocking robots that serve multiple vending brands. ^_~)

(Marco Polo: - A more posh restaurant though may wish to have an entirely human workforce as the clientele would want that special extra. other restaurants may go for a compromise with perhaps an automated ordering and payment system but with a few waiters making sure everyone is happy. perhaps 1/3 of the work force could be freed up here.)

(shadow cup: - Oh yes there is room to free up the working population here but it will always be nice to be served by a friendly human face. ^_^ With drastically less hours (10-20) and at least some compatibility this would work well.)


(Marco Polo: - Engineer

Engineers of whatever type have already been helped many times by machines be they computers, tools, optical instruments etc. although these tools save a great amount of time and ensure greater accuracy as well as lower cost of construction, the engineer or 'brains' will always be needed.

Graphic designer

Similar to engineers but have also been granted a wonderful tool with the PC. this can only continue to evolve as anyone who uses Photoshop knows.)

(shadow cup: - Yes machines do allow humans to get things done much, much faster than through manual means. Soon enough we may even start seeing walk-in computers that are incorporated into a living space, allowing maximum interaction with users on virtually all levels (in the same spirit as the star trek holideck I suppose) as well as portable extensions of lesser capability but no heavier than a single kilo (holographic technology permitting).)

(Marco Polo: - Doctor/medical

People are already becoming more health aware with sources on the internet widely accessed. it is an area where one must exercise extreme caution but imagine a 'wired' home in the future where a client may be able to speak to his GP from the home and may even be able to take tests from the home and send the results to his GP for diagnosis.

Another idea with the 'wired' home is house care. an OAP may be monitored by a local nurse without the need for daily visits. if something is wrong they would be alerted automatically')

(shadow cup: - I can imagine that scenario. Where a single panel incorporates a number of scanners of use to an observing GP. One might also say that as human understanding of the body increases so too would the ability of the machine to correctly identify ailments both current and potential.

On another level it would become possible for a single surgeon to perform several delicate operations without need to change location, his awareness being projected to two different wards where operations are closely lined up.

Again however I believe that human anatomy is one of those fields that can be heavily automated as, once correctly programmed, a machine of sufficient caliber would not blunder. Humans are biologically constructed by rules. There may be variations but the rules are always the centre of gravity here.

Whatever the case may be there is still the matter of the human touch being required to comfort patients and the sort.)

(Marco Polo: - Lawyer

There is nothing I would like more than the eradication of this species but this is another area in which things can be vastly improved even today!

Why should we continually have to visit our lawyers when we could do a very similar job over the net. we can scan and send documents to our hearts content and free up lawyers very precious time.

Online services advising on law could also be created. more lawyers can be freed up and we may be able to bring this plague under control.)

(shadow cup: - On a different level computers and machines may be used to ensure that judgments are proportionally fair and free of personal prejudice.)

(Marco Polo: - All in all the possibilities for freedom are almost infinite.

Mark just had his fuzzy time)

(shadow cup: - Well Mark, the fuzzy waters are warm. ;c) That is what the topic is here for. I like to think of it as a sketchbook for what might be.)

-----

(Marco Polo: - Your mind drifts more than mine. people need it explained in a more down to earth way and in what they can relate to. most people cant tell the difference between their asshole and a hole in the ground. take it easy on them.

(shadow cup: - And here I thought that I 'was' being easy on them! /:cP I wasn't delving into intricate explanations of how each might possibly come to pass. There is a time and a place for everything. Until then I can only hope for a well-meaning interpreter. ^_~; )

(Marco Polo: - Men were laughed at when they said the earth was round! The Earth is still seen as flat by many.)

(shadow cup: - And here I was thinking that we are sitting on a planet of delicate stability, of floating tectonic plates of relatively cool crust suspended upon a molten core... ^_^;;;)

(Marco Polo: - What do any of you think of such spaced out concepts as 3D television? Something quite a way off?)

(shadow cup: - 3D television is not at all spaced out. It is merely not done yet. The complications involved depend entirely upon the level of complexity and clarity sought. It also depends on our definition of 3D in this instance. If one wants to be picky one could say that we already have 3D television (the third being chronology) and are now striving for the 4th dimension. ;cP

We dreamers are used to being laughed at... It isn't right that we need to endure such but one needs to endure in order to take the crucial next steps forward that others fear to take. We trust that others will follow with dust strewn over the chasm invisibly bridged...)
Report to moderator   Logged
Placed by Circumstance - Seeker by Design - Philosopher by Choice - Path Forger by Destiny...
 \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' [/CO
marco polo
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11571

« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2006, 10:46:29 PM »

Quote from: shadow_cup
Welcome. This is a segment and forms a part of the Fuzzy Time series. For a look at a full range of the topics dealt with kindly visit "Fuzzy Time - Fragments of an Ideology"

I look forward to reading any feedback that you may have but I request that you kindly place any general or non-contributory comments in the "General Discussion" thread.

-----

On the Role of Automation


Since time immemorable the human race had existed in a labour-intensive culture. The men spent time hunting, gathering lumber or, when civilization turned to agriculture, tended the fields or fashioned tools to lessen the burden upon their daily lives while the women helped in the fields and took care of the homestead and the men. Racking up an existence was a job that took up a significant portion of the day.

Then came the industrial revolution - the advent of the machine and other technologies and, long story short, today we live in an age when things happen much faster than a couple of hundred years ago.

Now one would expect that this revelation would have eased the burden upon the individual by a great factor... and it did... but humanity negatively compensated through the ambitious rat race syndrome that we have been programmed from a young age to believe... that idle time is wasted time.


you dont see africans as men? he only got half way through that.
Report to moderator   Logged

We must built ships that will not traverse the Seven Seas but the Milky Way and the stars beyond, ships with no sails but engines powered by fuel, sweat and the creative cunning of the race that gave the world everything and will give the universe more than even God ever dreamt of. - Ogeno
marco polo
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11571

« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2006, 11:03:30 PM »

btw, 3d tv exists guys! no, a niggger didnt invent it. made by philips.

automation. we can go on for days. free man, enslave machines.
Report to moderator   Logged

We must built ships that will not traverse the Seven Seas but the Milky Way and the stars beyond, ships with no sails but engines powered by fuel, sweat and the creative cunning of the race that gave the world everything and will give the universe more than even God ever dreamt of. - Ogeno
shadow cup
James Cauchi
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2331

« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2007, 11:03:46 PM »

A step closer... ^_^

The Fabricator
Report to moderator   Logged
Placed by Circumstance - Seeker by Design - Philosopher by Choice - Path Forger by Destiny...
 \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' \' [/CO
IMPERIUM
Norman Lowell
Global Moderator
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14480


« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2012, 09:10:26 AM »

http://www.ariannaeditrice.it:80/articolo.php?id_articolo=42685



www.ariannaeditrice.it




----------------------------------


"Modernity - the curse of "La Demonia del Economia" as Evola describes it.
Whites turned into robots in factories, offices - slaving for 40 hours a week and more.
A soul-destroying society: worse than the times described by Dickens.


And our factories trans-locate to India or China or wherever.
Where the ant heap peoples are used to the monotony, the drudgery of it all.
Monotony is the spice of life for the Oriental.


We do not need the 40 hour week - we do not need factories full of Whites slaves.
Our genius can produce Robots that perform all the repetitive production processes.
We need to re-orientate our Culture, our Way of Life.


2012: Anno Zero!
Imperium
201203
Report to moderator   Logged
Boycott The Times and The Sunday Times.
Do not post there, do not buy a copy of either, do not advertise.
Hurt Them in the only way they understand.

BOYCOTT THE TIMES
 Imperium 1107

IMPERIUM
Norman Lowell
Global Moderator
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14480


« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2012, 08:05:13 PM »

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jan/08/cut-working-week-urges-thinktank

Cut the working week to a maximum of 20 hours, urge top economistsJob sharing and increased leisure are the answer to rising unemployment, claims thinktank

Share 7288
Email Heather Stewart The Observer, Sunday 8 January 2012 Jump to comments (229) 
Unemployment levels are rising within both Britain and the eurozone. Photograph: Mark Richardson/Alamy
Britain is struggling to shrug off the credit crisis; overworked parents are stricken with guilt about barely seeing their offspring; carbon dioxide is belching into the atmosphere from our power-hungry offices and homes. In London on Wednesday, experts will gather to offer a novel solution to all of these problems at once: a shorter working week.Robert Skidelsky, the Keynesian economist, who has written a forthcoming book with his son, Edward, entitled How Much Is Enough?, argued that rapid technological change means that even when the downturn is over there will be fewer jobs to go around in the years ahead. "The civilised answer should be work-sharing. The government should legislate a maximum working week."

Many economists once believed that as technology improved, boosting workers' productivity, people would choose to bank these benefits by working fewer hours and enjoying more leisure. Instead, working hours have got longer in many countries. The UK has the longest working week of any major European economy.

Skidelsky says politicians and economists need to think less about the pursuit of growth. "The real question for welfare today is not the GDP growth rate, but how income is divided."

Parents of young children already have the right to request flexible working, but the NEF would like to see job-sharing and alternative work patterns become much more widespread, and is calling on the government to make flexible working a default right for everyone.

------------------------------------------

We came out with a 15 hour week in 2000 with:
CREDO: A book for the very few.
Always ahead of the rest.


Chapter 2  THE NEW REVOLUTION 15 hour week  

Structural unemployment could result from all this.   It need not do so.   Economic progress has been defined as producing with four men what was formerly produced by five; and creating alternative employment for the fifth.   

This will indeed happen as whole new industries come into being, based on new products ranging from home computers linked to supranational information networks, to intercommunicating word processors.   

Moreover, there will be a shift of emphasis towards the service and knowledge industries.   Jobs in commerce, banking, finance, computer programming, tourism and leisure and most of all education, will be created by the thousands.   

But all this could not by itself absorb the tremendous increase in productivity which will take place.   There will have to be a drastic reappraisal of that sacred cow of both politicians and unions; the 40 hour week.   

Since the thirties, while all else has changed, the 40 hour week has remained sacrosanct.   Why? Because man had, as yet, not sufficiently developed his productive potential.   Now he can do so.   The day will come, much sooner then mediocrity-majority conceives, when the 15-hours, three-day week will be the normFree Enterprise    

Only free enterprise will make all this possible.   Innovation demands risk taking.   The dynamic entrepreneur risking everything in new, untried ideas and ventures will blaze the way.   Small and medium companies today strain against the constrains posed by big government and big labour.   One with its fussy restrictions, the other getting its way regardless of the market.

The establishment, the monopoly corporation, the overgrown unions, the politicians, bureaucrats all petrified at the very idea of change, will see in the silicon chip only the spectre of mass unemployment.   

What terrifies the establishment most? A 6% unemployment rate.   What nonsense! They have not the vision nor the nerve to live in this brave new world.     Look at them today.   Their ideal is a risk avoiding, selfish society.   A society where both monopoly corporations and unions put their money in ultraconservative blue chip investments.   Where this ungodly alliance fights for the survival of antiquated, dying industries at the expense of new products and ideas.   They fail to realise the biological dictum that if one is not growing, one is inevitably dying.   They are the new reactionaries.   

And we bear their results.   Shoddy goods, service, appliances which break down with mathematical precision a couple of months after their guarantee expires.   Why? Because we have to preserve the 40-hour myth.   

We have to keep producing goods which break down in order to make others, which, in turn, last even shorter.    In 1946, Du Pont the giant conglomerate, had the formula for producing ladies tights which could pull an army truck without splitting.   In the early fifties it had produced an indestructible synthetic leather which could have made shoes last a lifetime.   Both ideas remained safely locked up in a safe.   

You see, we have to keep the population working endlessly 5 days a week, 8 hours a day.     We will have to change our ways.   We will produce durable goods.   indestructible crockery, appliances, cars, everything imaginable.   Goods which will not be torn from mother earth to be then wasted.   Goods which will be capable of destruction only through recycling at the end of their life or, through genuine necessity due to further innovation.

Third World Our IslandFinally, let us feel, think, act European.
   March 1980
Published in the Times of Malta 3.   4.   80 


2012: Anno Zero!
Imperium
201208
Report to moderator   Logged
Boycott The Times and The Sunday Times.
Do not post there, do not buy a copy of either, do not advertise.
Hurt Them in the only way they understand.

BOYCOTT THE TIMES
 Imperium 1107

IMPERIUM
Norman Lowell
Global Moderator
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14480


« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2012, 11:41:57 AM »

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20120807/world/Another-step-forward-for-mankind.431896

Tuesday, August 7, 2012
Another step forward for mankindthe room filled with jubilation as the mission team cheered, exchanged hugs and chief scientists handed out Mars chocolate bars.

President Barack Obama described the feat as a singular source of American pride.Notice the Zionist title of the Zionist ToM.
Another step forward for mankind
Nowhere in the article is "mankind" mentioned - just in the Zionist Heading.

Anything to demean the achievement of Whites.
Anything to promote "humankindness" and "multiculturalism and equality"
The Rodents!

Space is a White Man's preserve - whatever a Kenyan, mulatto president of the JewSA says.
We of Imperium Europa, will squash mercilessly any attempt at Space Exploration, by non-Europids.
The Solar System and the Beyond: Belong to Us!


2012: Anno Zero!
Imperium
201208

« Last Edit: August 07, 2012, 11:44:51 AM by IMPERIUM » Report to moderator   Logged
Boycott The Times and The Sunday Times.
Do not post there, do not buy a copy of either, do not advertise.
Hurt Them in the only way they understand.

BOYCOTT THE TIMES
 Imperium 1107

Stephen Farrugia
Senior Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061


Malta Taghna

« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2012, 08:59:29 AM »

In defense of lazinesshttp://www.amerika.org/social-reality/in-defense-of-laziness/

What a wonderful message and so correct, if not dead accurate. Thanks for uploading it.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 
SMF 2.0.12 | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
TinyPortal © 2005-2012

VivaMalta - The Free Speech Forum, FT - On the Role of Automation - Theme by Mustang Forums