VivaMalta - The Free Speech Forum - Malta’s membership of the European Union

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Author Topic: Malta’s membership of the European Union  (Read 503 times)
Hastings
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« on: April 04, 2017, 07:10:09 PM »

I am new on this forum, however I would like to ask this question:-

You had a referendum on joining the European Union on the 8th March 2003,
you answered yes, although by a very narrow majority, (your Labour Party
rejected the result, however as they were not the majority party the result held)

you then joined the  European Union as a member on 1st May 2004.

What I would like to ask you is what have you gained by being a member of
 the EU, and how have you benefited by this membership, since joining?.


« Last Edit: April 04, 2017, 09:22:06 PM by Königsberger » Report to moderator   Logged
Hodekin
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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2017, 08:45:49 AM »

A thoughtful and erudite reply from Königsberger, well written!

I believe that it perfectly portrays the potential advantages that this sort of social union can offer, particularly from smaller nations who would benefit from financial assistance in the areas stated. However, nothing is for nothing, and to take advantage of these windfalls requires the acceptance of the whole package which includes the less savoury realities of open borders and increasing direct rule from Brussels.

The EU is an economic controlled entity, run with, for and by money. Follow the money and one finds the controllers hidden behind the faceless Eurocrats. And we have to recognise that the European Union is becoming less European day by day!

To accept money for the finer things in life at the expense of our own spiritual and racial integrity is little more than selfish short sited prostitution.  We as true Europeans are much better than that and deserve a Europe which extols the premise that its most precious asset is its people, the European people!

Hodekin
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Together in Britain we have lit a flame that the ages shall not extinguish. Guard that sacred flame my brother Blackshirts until it illuminates Britain and lights again the Paths of Mankind.

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Hastings
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« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2017, 10:06:36 PM »

Thank you both for your reply’s, like all conversations we don’t all have to agree with each other’s views,
let’s face it if we all sang from the same hymn sheet, there would be no point in having a discussion.

As far as the EU is concerned as an organisation, I will hold back for now as I would like, to  ask more in
relation to Malta’s membership of the European Union.

I have a great fondness for the Country of Malta and its people, who I think are brilliant, especially after
what they went through during the second world war, and the hardships they had to suffer.

If we go back to the early 1960’s, I was in Malta when there were demonstrations in Valetta in relation to
Independence, some of these demonstrations were very forceful, and eventually resulted in the
British Parliament giving Malta its independence in 1964. Malta then became a republic in 1974.

This was obviously the what the majority of the Maltese people wanted, however not everybody wished to
cut their ties with the  UK, but this was a democratic decision, so it happened, me as an individual I wished
Malta the very best of luck, I really kept my fingers crossed for the Maltese people.

What I really find difficult to understand, is after all those  years, of pushing for independence from the UK,
why would Malta give it all away by becoming a member of the EU, in my opinion Malta is no longer an
independent country (none of the members of the EU are in my opinion independent), nearly all of its
laws are now made by Brussel’s, it no longer has any control of its economy, by joining the EU Malta
has had to adopt the euro, which like Greece is unable to devalue if the economy requires it, I don’t think
Greece would be in the predicament that it is in if it could of devalued.

To round my post off Malta does not have full jurisdiction over its courts, like all members of the EU they
are unable to get rid of, undesirables without the permission of the Court of human Right, that’s not a
democracy, and it certainly is not independence.   



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Hodekin
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« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2017, 10:43:29 AM »


If we go back to the early 1960’s, I was in Malta when there were demonstrations in Valetta in relation to
Independence, some of these demonstrations were very forceful, and eventually resulted in the
British Parliament giving Malta its independence in 1964. Malta then became a republic in 1974.


I too remember those times, I was a visitor back then, no more than 10 or 11 years old, I (and my family) was spat at and on one occasion attacked in the street.  We were also shown the greatest kindness by other Maltese people at the same time. It was not a good situation and one which at the time I had a confused understanding of.

Hodekin
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Together in Britain we have lit a flame that the ages shall not extinguish. Guard that sacred flame my brother Blackshirts until it illuminates Britain and lights again the Paths of Mankind.

Sir Oswald Mosley
Hastings
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2017, 09:30:24 PM »


The demonstrations in the 1960 are now all in the past, however  Hodekin, I also was  in Malta at the time, my wife is Maltese, I was talking to her in her place of work which was a company in Republican Street (Kingsway), called Mitze Brothers, the owner of the shop closed the shutters in case of trouble, so I was locked in for about 3 hours, still it gave me the chance to talk to the wife as we were getting married the following day, but enough of that.

Prior to independence, a large number of the population of Malta, were employed by the MOD (British Ministry of Defence), there was RAF Luqa, Halfar, St Angelo, Manwel Island. My father-in-law, on his retirement he received a really good pension, he told me that any employees working for the MOD, also received a good pension (it was indexed linked), based on their position, time served etc; etc; the really great thing about this pension was that on his death, his wife would receive for the rest of her life half of his pension. At that time unemployment was extremely low.

Not only did Malta have relatively low unemployment, but it also had a massive ship repair business, with the Massive China Dock, one of the biggest dry docks in the world, Malta is now left with Bailey’s, when I last looked through the gates last year, I have to say that it looked more like a storage place for scrap metal, my brother-in-law worked for Bailey’s he has now retired due to ill health, he has a very minimal pension, although he worked for them for 35 years, and if anything happens to him his pension will finish, and his wife will, will have to rely on the small amount of money she will get from the government.

Population of Malta:- 0.4 million

Since becoming a member of the EU:-
Minimum wage: 720.46 EUR per month (Jan 2015) Eurostat
Unemployment rate: 5.7% (Apr 2015) Eurostat
Government debt: 73.0% of GDP (2013) Eurostat
Unless these figures have changed.

Malta is weak in several areas of their economic freedom. Tax rates and government spending, are very high. Corruption and rigid labour regulations add to the cost of doing business. The way I see it is that Malta’s fiscal health will require the containment of the wage bill, social transfers, and pension funds.

Being a member of the European Union is of no assistance to  Malta what so ever,
if fact I would say it makes things worse.












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Hastings
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2017, 09:39:21 PM »

What a surprise from the EU meeting in Malta that the leaders have
 now shown their hand. Angela Merkel leading the band with the idea
 that there will be no discussions before we actually leave the EU.
 (the common name for this is blackmail-bullying, that is  what Malta
could expect if it decided to leave this so called club)
Seeing the UK
imports a great deal more from the EU than we export she is defiantly
starting with a poor hand.

The German economy is booming. It’s no wonder she wants it to remain
as it is whereas France has a larger population, but contributes less to it
 than the UK, and claims the largest amount of European subsides with
its inefficient farming system.

This was to be expected when Mrs Merkel pulls the strings Sergeant Bilko
(alias Francoise Holland) jumps. Time will tell – do we need Volkswagen,
 Renault or Peugeot? There are plenty of other manufacturers around the world.

Total Maltese contributions to the EU budget; €0.092 billion.
Malta’s contribution to the EU budget as % of its GNI: 1.08%

In 2015 the taxpayers of Malta received from the European Union
 23 euros per head over what they contributed. Since it joined the EU.

Now the rebate money received, sounds great, but it has strings attached,
 the Maltese government cannot spend it in anyway it would wish, the
 EU tells you what it is to be spent on, and this could be something
 which is not necessarily of top importants to Malta its people or its economy.

Just remember Brussels does not do anything out of the kindness of its heart,
 it does not have one, so there is most probably an utterer motive, which the
EU will collect on when it suits them and not, the member state.






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Hastings
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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2017, 08:02:30 PM »

Malta has few natural resources, the country imports most of its
 food and fresh water and 100% of its energy. Your economy
depends on tourism, trade, and manufacturing. There is a growing
 concern about the level of immigration from North Africa, which is
 causing problems for the country financially.

Your top level of individual taxes and corporate tax rates are 35%,
 that does not include VAT (which you would not have to pay if you
were not in the EU), and capital gains tax. The overall tax burden
equals 35.6% of total domestic income.

Your government is spending 42.8% (GDP) over the past three years,
and your budget have averaged 2.0% of GDP. Malta’s public debt is
 equivalent to 64.0% of GDP.

Malta’s economy relies more on imports than exports which makes fuel
 and raw materials the most imported goods, the most imported product
 is petroleum which represents about 33% of imports, which Malta has
to pay for out of its income from taxes etc;.

Let’s look at Greece, its economy was much bigger than Malta’s but by
 joining the EU and taking on the euro their economy has been devastated,
and my real worry is that a small country like Malta could if the EU ruled
 end up with the same problem. (god forbid).

In 2015 Greece’s Democracy was crushed! and Austerity Imposed!.

In 2015 the Greek people voted against austerity. It was imposed on them
 by the European Union Commission anyway.

The Greek Government was forced to sign an agreement which stated:-
“ No unilateral fiscal or other policy actions will be taken by the Greek
government. All measures, legislative or otherwise, taken during the
 programme period, which may have an impact on banks’ operations,
solvency, liquidity or asset quality should be taken only with the agreement
 of the European Commission and European Central Bank. This ensures that
 German and French bankers will get their money at the expense of Greek
 workers and their impoverished families.

So much for being an independent country, does Malta really wish to take
 a chance and be part of this?     








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Hastings
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2017, 05:16:15 PM »


The beauty of this Idea is that it will solve most, if not all, of those anomalies that you mentioned with a laissez-faire approach. Like I said before, the biggest political problem of the current EU is that it legislates where it shouldn't and does not legislate where it ought to.

With regard to the Greek financial crisis, the Greeks have only themselves to blame now. After voting in successive governments who milked the country dry with false hopes and promises, the electorate once again recently refused to grow up politically-speaking.       
On the other hand, the Germans have been working themselves silly and, notwithstanding the historical baggage, have built up the largest economy in Europe.

I agree with a lot of what you say! and I also agree with the fact the
 EU tends to medal in members domestic situations that don’t concern
 or should not concern them.

However I do feel that you have missed out one critical part of your statement,
 and that is the fact people tend to be greedy, once in power. There is a saying,
"Absolute power corrupts absolutely", in my opinion that is the main problem
with the EU.

Every venal politician and corrupt official in the EU uses the argument that ‘the
end justifies the means’ in order to continue battening on the people and enriching
themselves at our expense.

As far as Greece is concerned I also agree with you, however if the likes of Germany
 and France had not allowed them to join in the first place, after knowing that the
Greek, economy was not up to joining the euro, Greece would have just continued in
 its own way.

If because of their corruption they went bankrupt that would be up to them, but I
believe EU helped put that country in the position in which it finds itself. Germany
 is the country in the EU who has profited the most from the euro.


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