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Norman Lowell
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« Reply #100 on: September 01, 2017, 11:27:52 AM »

http://www.independent.com.mt/articles/2017-09-01/local-news/Saying-it-in-Maltese-Siblings-on-a-mission-to-make-you-say-it-right-6736178469


 Saying it in Maltese: Siblings on a mission to make you say it right

 Reuben Degiorgio and his sister Audrienne are passionate about the Maltese language. Reuben, in particular, grew even fonder of the Maltese language when he started studying to become a translator, a profession he now practices in Brussels. ...


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The first para says it all - saving his useless job in Brussels.
Uncaring as to the mental damage on our children, as this Arabic claque tears into their European genetic essence.
A poor, Arabic dialect spoken in soft Latin modulation - a curse on our People, as Fortunato Mizzi used to put it.

Read previous posts, especially Post no 1.



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« Reply #101 on: December 06, 2017, 08:30:31 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20171206/opinion/Demise-of-Maltese-language-Steve-Pace.664971


Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 06:32 by Steve Pace

Demise of Maltese language - Steve Pace

In an article published in this newspaper (November 17) titled ‘From “brejk” to “kompjuter”: final chance to comment on English-to-Maltese loanwords: You’ve got until the end of the year to speak up’, it was claimed that we will be given a last chance to voice our opinion on the use of foreign words on loan in the Maltese language.
I feel that going back in history may help us understand why now it seems that the situation has literally gone out of hand and an ad-hoc council feels the need to put a lid on it.
From many years, earlier than my school days back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the Maltese language was considered a second-class citizen’s choice of language. We were brought up considering Maltese as a low-level form of communication. English was the main language to be used.
Many families spoke English. Our Church schools taught practically every subject in English. Notes, books, essays, competitions, school events and all other activities were presented in English. The Maltese language had no place in our curriculum. It only had a minor placement in the school timetable, limited to a couple of lessons a week.
We never really felt the need to use our own language. Maltese seemed practically useless and had no value whatsoever in our daily lives or professional careers and served no purpose outside our shores.
Many aspects of our culture seem to have been affected by politics or religion for a long time and I believe our mother language was in many ways another victim of such prevailing forces. In the era when the British set sail back to their motherland, local politics created a division between those who favoured the British rule to those who vehemently opposed it and loathed each and every English syllable.
This eternal damning division saw a substantial portion of our culture and heritage being systemically obliterated by both fronts. The mercenaries marching through our roads, had no mercy. They wanted to reach their goals, at all costs. The Maltese language was also in the way of reaching these goals.
It was therefore granted no mercy and its destruction was institutionalised. Our colonial mentality gave us the feeling of being inferior. Our mother language was one key feature making us recognisable as Maltese or possibly Arabs. This was not acceptable for many of us and we sought refuge in the English language which offered us some degree of comfort.
It gave us a sense of not feeling alone, not feeling isolated from the remainder of the world. Then there were those opposing the British fronts, who also had a job to do. They made sure that all the patrimony of historical heritage built by the British Empire were left rotting, vandalised, destroyed, ridiculed and mocked.
Society develops its linguistic skills from media and this has never been so true as it is since the advent of social media and internet
They enforced Arabic into our schools and removed French as an obligatory subject. English remained, possibly as a compromise not to irk too much the mass-controlling institutions. Very little effort was done to assist the moribund mother language to life. It seemed that the opposing forces were more interested in meeting their agendas rather than claim what was Maltese.
The decadence of the language pursued and not only persisted but infiltrated every professional career and unfortunately reached media and its journalists. The professionals adopted foreign words and used a despicable method of introducing them as local words by replacing their foreign spelling into the equivalent phonetic Maltese spelling.
From an extract of a document taken from the Akademja tal-Malti dated 1984, it is stated that: “Words of foreign origin, take their value as Maltese words when they are accepted and used by society. From then on, these words should be considered to be part of the Maltese language and in order to write them there is no necessity to refer to their origins. There is also no need to comprehend a foreign language. You only have to know how the word is pronounced and said in Maltese. This is achieved by using phonetics, ergo how the word sounds, as that is the way the people have adopted it.”
In my personal opinion, throughout all this the academy of Maltese and other organisations allowed this charade to progress and grow. They were the ones who let the language deteriorate so much. Their responsibility was to ensure that the Maltese language developed in a methodical and academic manner. Above all, their duty was to protect the language from extinction.
They claimed and still do, that a language is “alive” and therefore needs to consider the sociological changes and integrate those changes within itself. If only things were so simple. Society develops its linguistic skills from media and this has never been so true as it is since the advent of social media and internet.
This, however, should not mean that any adopted word is legitimate and should be considered a Maltese word, simply because people use it. As time passes, the language on social media is becoming very cryptic and a lot of abbreviations are being used. To mention a few examples, lol, BRB, GM, u2, and so many others.
Should these be considered as being Maltese? Should the academically non-qualified linguist journalists who wake up and decide to adopt a foreign word using simplistic phonetics as they please, be the ones who are deciding what goes in our language? Should they not be the ones to do research and rather than rush to press, look for alternative Maltese words?
The responsibility of breathing life in the Maltese language lies on those who are seeking to destroy it. Unfortunately this is the case with most of our local issues. We have the wrong people in the wrong places. The decision makers are those who still suffer the side effects of the engrained, defeatist mentality. They feel the burden of being Maltese and are simply not proud of their home. They are not proud to be Maltese. They are the ones delivering the final blows to our Maltese language.
Steve Pace is a company director and ICT consultant.


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Very good article.
The damage wrought upon our children by these Professuri tal-Bigilla.
Read previous posts.



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« Reply #102 on: December 19, 2017, 05:47:27 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20171218/local/officials-unconcerned-about-students-low-ranking-in-maltese-reading.665803


Monday, December 18, 2017, 18:07 by Claire Caruana

Officials unconcerned about students’ low ranking in Maltese reading proficiency
Say the figures do not reflect reality


Education officials have dismissed the low score in Maltese reading achieved by 10-year-olds in a major international study as not being representative of the real situation in Malta.

Recent results from the 2016 Progress in International Reading Study (PIRLS) ranked Malta in 40th place out of the 50 countries which participated.

The Maltese pupils were awarded a reading score of 452, which is lower than the 457 awarded on the PIRLS test in 2011 and below the international average score of 500.

In 2011, Maltese pupils were also tested on English reading, in which they achieved a score of 477. In that year, the overall Maltese ranking was 35th out of 45 countries.

EDITORIAL: Literacy skills are deteriorating

Charles Mifsud from the University of Malta Centre for Literacy and Gaetano Bugeja, director of the Education Ministry’s Learning and Assessment Programmes, told this newspaper that as the test was carried out in Maltese, it did not take into account the fact that for a good number of students, their strongest language was English.

“It was clear that we have a number of students, some 20 per cent, whose first language is English, with the study showing that most of these students come from Church or independent schools,” Mr Mifsud said.

The average score awarded to Malta was lower, he went on, because it was brought down by those whose first language is not Maltese.

He pointed out that pupils in independent schools were more likely to struggle with Maltese, so the study did not present an adequate picture of the literacy situation in all schools.

For the PIRLS study, students from 95 primary schools all over Malta were selected at random, with geographical representation being taken into consideration. Of the 3,647 students who participated, 2,033 attended State schools, while 1,245 students were selected from Church schools. Only 369 students came from independent schools.

“We need to look at the results critically and go beyond what we see, because at face value Malta’s ranking went down, but I don’t think we’re comparing like with like,” Mr Mifsud said, insisting it was not right to say the ranking was lower.

He added that other bilingual countries could opt to have the test in the two official languages, something that was not allowed in Malta, as it would make the sample of students too small to test.

Pressed to say whether, despite the bilingual situation in Malta, the result was being considered an alarming one, especially since both languages are a requirement for students who want to get into post-secondary institutions and university, Mr Mifsud reiterated that “the results are not indicating that the students did worse”.

“It is alarming because the world ranking went down but our situation did not change. The last time round we placed 35 out of 45 countries, this time round we came in at 40 out of 50 countries because of the issue with the test language,” he repeated.

Mr Bugeja pointed out that, as had been the case with other studies in the past, improvements to the school system would be effected to better address certain issues.

“We also need to keep in mind that we have a number of students who are not Maltese and so when tested in the language, they will surely struggle, even if there are efforts in place to help them learn the language,” Mr Bugeja said.

The pair also pointed out that the language situation in Malta and all over the world changes rapidly, with regular profiling required to assess the needs of the students, especially with the influx of foreigners in recent years.

Asked whether Malta would opt out of the next PIRLS in light of the claims that the result was not a true reflection of the national literacy situation, Mr Mifsud said that failure to take part in such studies could also raise concerns.

“With this sort of study we would rather look at all the components separately, since in some areas we remained the same, in others we noted improvements and others not so much.

“What we are interested in is the breakdown of result.”

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Hours of school lessons and study wasted on this poor, Arabic language: Ic-Cuqlajta.
Just a handful of Professuri tal-Bigilla wrought this Cultural Damage on three generations of Maltese.
When, in 1971 the Squallids gave them free rein to turn us into Arabs.


Read Post 78



00512
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« Reply #103 on: December 23, 2017, 10:49:38 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20171223/local/history-students-exhibit-shallow-knowledge-of-eu-matters.666322?utm_source=tom&utm_campaign=top5&utm_medium=widget


Saturday, December 23, 2017, 09:01 by Keith Micallef
History students show lack of esssential historial and linguistic skills
Some unable to give exact date of Malta's EU accession
Students checking their exam results. Photo: Matthew Mirabelli
Students checking their exam results. Photo: Matthew Mirabelli
The circumstances leading to Malta’s EU membership seem to be a hard nut to crack for history students, to the point that some were unable to tell that Guido de Marco was foreign minister or give the exact date of accession.

The shallow knowledge of EU matters was exposed in the replies given by history students who sat for the Secondary Education Certificate last May.

In their annual review, examiners warned that interest in the subject was waning, as the number of students sitting for the exam had dropped to 185 – the lowest in the last six years.

Of these, 55 per cent obtained a grade between 1 (highest) and 5 (the lowest accepted for entry into post-secondary schools).

As in previous years, concern was also expressed about what examiners described as “worrying patterns”, such as a lack of essential historical and basic linguistic skills. While the majority answered the questions in English, many found it difficult to express themselves in either Maltese or English, especially when it came to essay writing.

A major trend that emerged in this year’s crop of students was that the majority performed better in European and international history. On the other hand, candidates’ knowledge of the content for Maltese history appears to be shallow, especially for the 19th century period and Malta’s bid for EU membership.

In the latter case, students were expected to make a brief analysis of the role played by the late Prof. de Marco in the process that led to Malta’s accession in 2004.

Though these events happened in the last 25 years, most candidates were unable to give a good explanation. The report pointed out that most students did not know that Prof. de Marco was Malta’s foreign affairs minister.

Many limited themselves, saying that he had made important decisions, but only a couple pointed out that he was the one to formally launch the negotiation process and present Malta’s membership bid on July 16, 1990.

Apart from this, students left much to be desired when tested on their knowledge of the Accession Treaty. While some correctly replied that the signing took place in Athens in 2003, others were completely off the mark, mentioning bizarre places like Valletta, Marsa and Fort St Angelo.

Only few could give the exact date of accession: May 1, 2004.

From a further analysis, it transpires that very few candidates felt confident answering questions on Malta’s relations with Britain under Prime Ministers George Borg Olivier and Dom Mintoff. This trend stems from the fact that only nine students among those sitting for Paper IIA, which is more challenging than Paper IIB, chose the topic.

The least popular questions were those dealing with the formation of the European Economic Community and its major treaties, as well as Malta’s foreign policies after 1964.

In the latter case, no feedback was given by the examiners, since only one candidate had chosen the question.

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The damage wrought by those handful of Professuri tal-Bigilla.
They ruined 3 generations of our youth - imposing Arabic thinking and speaking.
A damage that affects us in every sphere of life: they way we think, act, drive, indifference to the environment, lack of reading.....



00512
The Golden Dawn
Imperium
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Boycott The Times and The Sunday Times.
Do not post there, do not buy a copy of either, do not advertise.
Hurt Them in the only way they understand.

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 Imperium 1107

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