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Königsberger
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« Reply #220 on: May 13, 2017, 07:45:56 AM »

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170513/local/reject-candidates-who-incite-racial-hatred-parties-told.647707

And who exactly is this 'think tank'? A person who holds democracy so close to heart that he asks for legitimate candidates to be barred from contesting? This is not a democracy but a travesty of democracy.
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« Reply #221 on: May 13, 2017, 10:53:37 AM »

http://www.pfcmalta.org/our-team.html

Re previous post.


Spot the Rodents in Human Form in this outfit.
You will find the Rodents everywhere, directing the naive goyim.
Hirsch is another one at San Anton, holding talks there as if she owns the place.







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« Last Edit: May 13, 2017, 10:56:43 AM by IMPERIUM » Report to moderator   Logged
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« Reply #222 on: May 30, 2017, 11:47:50 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170530/opinion/An-economy-on-steroids.649396


 Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 07:10 by Marie Briguglio


An economy on steroids


In the run-up to this election, I have been asked to comment on Malta’s economic success on several occasions. My answer has been to confirm that, yes, the economy grew, yes, there is considerable cash in hand and yes business is doing well. But any person who owns a purse and a bank account knows that what makes you rich is not how much money you have in your hand, nor how much you spend.
If you spend your savings, you may feel great in the short term but it will not be long before you are broke. How much of this growth burst we are experiencing involved cashing-in on Malta’s assets? By this I mean Malta’s natural and social assets: its protected land, its landscape, its village cores, its entities, its institutions, its reputation, its social capital.
We seem to have thrown it all into the furnace that makes the economic flame burn. We have thrown in all sorts of planning permits, major infrastructure deals, citizenship sales, tax holidays, recruitment with the public sector: the works.  The flame is bright and hot – in the short term.
But what can we throw in, in a few years’ time to keep the fire burning? What have we done to replace the depletion of natural capital? What have we done to invest in new business models? What do we do if trust, the basis of all economic transactions is eroded? Will others do business with us? Can we even do business with each other?
Our economy needs the accelerator pedal in some areas but, more than ever, it needs brakes in others
To be sure, this is not the first government that did whatever it could to incentivise economic growth. It is certainly not the first time that I’m commenting about killing the goose that lays the golden eggs. But at this point of Malta’s economic development, did we really need to go that far? Did we need the economy to grow so fast and furiously, the furnace to burn so hot?
Consider that we can barely find the people to fill the jobs we are creating – and that we have instead, provided work to thousands of Europeans. Consider also that part of the growth is predicated on very low wages which we are reluctant to shift, for fear of an economic shock (never mind the tsunamis we created in the rental market, and never mind the inflationary tax holidays granted on property purchases).
Consider that the vulnerable – women, children, the elderly, those who rent property – are still waiting for the trickle-down to happen. What they needed was to be given priority, and not the crumbs that fall from the table; an economy that grows from the bottom-up.
Addressing them seems to have been planned as the cherry on the cake – in the last year of this electoral term. Unfortunately, by the time the last year came, it was too late. Others had eaten the cake and the term was up. The cherry is now dangling as a promise.
Certainly, our economy needs the accelerator pedal in some areas but, more than ever, it needs brakes in others. At the risk of stretching the metaphor, what it really needs is a sensitive steering wheel. Our men work longer hours than most Europeans, our mental and environmental health indicators are deteriorating and emissions targets are being missed.
We have less and less time or space to enjoy our families, to be a community.  Traffic, complete with pollution, accidents and loss of productive time, soars and yet, we continue to nurture the plague of cars with accommodating infrastructure (millions for roads).
We basically put the economy on broad-spectrum steroids, leaving the side-effects for later. What we desperately need is a government that operates less like private business, that is less intent on acting like a market-player and more keen on governing. A government that focuses less on sales and more on enhancing public goods like infrastructure (for people), police, open space, planning, enforcement, research and, most importantly trust.
A government that focuses on the human being not just on human spending.
Our economy is not an end in itself but a means to achieving quality of life and well-being for the people it sustains.
Economics itself is not a one-shot game: a short-term high is not sufficient to state we are doing well. Because a country does not shut down after one or two electoral terms.

Dr Marie Briguglio B.Com, B.A.Hons, M.Sc, Ph.D is an economist.


-----


 A very well written and well argued article.



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« Reply #223 on: June 12, 2017, 09:59:20 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170612/opinion/No-country-for-old-PN.650541


 Monday, June 12, 2017, 00:01 by Andrea de Marco

No country for old PN


The Nationalist Party is at a crossroads. This can be either a moment of opportunity or a moment of complete implosion. The writing has been on the wall for some time now, and it is quite worrying that there was evidently no concerted effort to bring the party out of the echo chamber and into the realm of the living (and the dead).
It is said hindsight is always 20/20 - but this is not about hindsight. Though many feel some form of anger, sadness, a sense of loss and disarray, the current situation provides the ideal conditions for the PN to reinvigorate itself and redefine the political platform it stands on. Those who mean the PN well should look at the current situation as an opportunity.
So where does the party go from here? First things first – picking the right people for the leadership as well as the executive branches should not be done hastily. The party needs to first define what the direction is going to be from here on, and then look into the right people fit for that direction.
There will be differing opinions, but there should be a unified motivation. Speaking about motivation, political mercenaries should be swept aside.
The party has to realise that the chances of being elected in five years’ time are slim. The focus should not be on winning for the sake of winning, but rather to set a strong, fresh, likeable foundation for the next couple of decades.
The PN needs to adjust the political spectrum it sees itself occupying. The roots of the party are conservative. But there are many schools of thought that can validly fall under this umbrella. In this day and age, it is important to let go of the idea that a party is an extension of archaic religious principles. It is good to be ethical and it is good to be clean.
It is not good to be Religio et Patria. Conservatism should limit itself to conserving what is right, and changing what is wrong – coincidentally the catchphrase used by PN in the last election. You can be fiscally conservative, and socially liberal – and that is the kind of modern conservative party the PN should strive to become.
The PN should offer the possibility of bringing in technocrats for a future election – scientists, engineers, economists and grassroots social activists
Considering the constitutional and governmental set-up Malta has built and achieved over the years, it should not be foregone at all to look at government as a tool to enact a form of left-leaning libertarianism.
The country (through both parties) has taken a centrist approach to politics, where almost everything is legislated and/or regulated to some extent. Looking forward, it is hard to imagine the repeal of such a structure to favour more laissez-faire options. This is why it is crucial for the future PN crop to occupy a wider spectrum than it currently occupies.
There are names and phrases within the PN, which taken together or separately, should simply be let go.
Speaking in less ideological terms, the party needs to consider the set-up of appropriate think tanks, with the participation of various experts in the field. Indeed, the party should offer the possibility of bringing in technocrats for a future election – scientists, engineers, economists and grassroots social activists.
There are many valid people out there, and some, one might say, have been waiting for an opportunity to contribute, and may have been left aside for far too long. It is time for the focus to be on quality, not quantity.
Politics is about openness, but this should not be confused with entitlement. The various pillars of our society such as health, economy, education, environment, investment and civil liberties require careful treatment, analysis and planning by a strong and skilled strategy team.
Adding to this, a shadow cabinet should no longer focus just on criticism of the party in government. It should also serve as a reference point for government, and be the team responsible for coming up with an electoral programme focusing on sound money, economic freedom, prosperity, engagement in class struggle and protection of individual rights from intended or unintended statist policies.
One of the best, and yet underutilised achievements of the PN were local councils. I was happy to hear the suggestion by AD, which proposed the idea of a local referendum for development projects within a particular region. While this idea merits its own analysis, the focus here is that it underlines the fact the local councils can be a source of inspiration for a new PN platform.
While there is an aspect to government centralisation on many issues which should not be ignored, it is important to try and decentralise the consultation process for many aspects of a new democracy – not just development.
For instance, it is important to realise that many people, though interested in academic discussions, are not that much into politics to the point that they want to be exposed publicly within one party of another. This is where local councils can come in – they allow a comfortable setting where politicians (who are after all elected in districts) can interact with different people from different localities and strata.
A political mandate should not take the form of a two-month door-knocking consultation process followed by five years of absolute governmental power, while citizens fall into a deep slumber and wait for the proverbial September to end.
The consultation process, the discourse, and the involvement of citizens should be active, continuous and free from pontification. A new PN liberal democratic platform should boost this process further.
Lastly, a PN in opposition, while serving as a check and balance for government performance and behaviour should not always be an opposition in an absolute way. The term is unfortunate. A refreshed party should remodel the opposition as a source of help, a second opinion, and a friend – friends sometimes tell us what we need to hear, even if we do not like it.
Most of all, it is time for the party to listen.
Andrea de Marco is a lecturer at the Institute of Space Sciences and Astronomy, University of Malta.

---------------


 A well worded, well argued and presented article.
Whether the PN (the Christian Hypocrites) are up to it - well that is another matter.
The Party is in shambles and peppered with those 69 Traitorous Lawyers, who betrayed their own Country and People.



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« Reply #224 on: June 12, 2017, 06:54:11 PM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170612/local/students-prepare-for-conservation-expedition-to-transylvania.650528

A handful of elites - not a hoard of bookworms. Recognising science, archaeology, history, and regionalism.
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« Reply #225 on: June 16, 2017, 08:35:14 AM »

http://www.vivamalta.net/VMforum/index.php?action=post;topic=10353.0;num_replies=224

Friday, June 16, 2017, 06:48 by Philip Mifsud

Simon Busuttil must go

Simon Busuttil must go, at least for the sake of his party.   My party, the one I militated in for some 15 years.  The one I always voted for and the one I canvassed for in the last general election.
Now that the election dust has settled a bit, the focus shifts on to the Nationalist Party.   Some very important decisions will be taken within the PN in the coming weeks.  These crucial decisions will dictate whether the PN will keep on digging or whether it will start building again.
Busuttil must go for a hundred and one reasons.  Let me outline a few.
Let’s look at the bigger picture first; Busuttil was elected leader of the Opposition in 2013.  Since then he always trailed behind Joseph Muscat in every opinion poll I saw by some 10 to 15 points.  People trusted, and still trust, Muscat more than they trust Busuttil.
Throughout these four years a perception has been built. Unfortunately for Busuttil, the perception out there is that he is not electable as a prime minister.  Quite honestly I do not think that this is completely his fault because he really tried his best.  But then again, if that was his best, it means that this is the furthest he can go, which is decisively not enough.
In most opinion polls I followed throughout these four years, Busuttil was even less popular then his own party.   This poses a real problem, as it puts him as a liability to the party rather than as an asset.  And let’s face it, there were instances when he really was a liability to his party.
He was definitely a liability to the PN when he handpicked Rosette Thake for secretary general of the PN and also when he, unilaterally, approved Salvu Mallia as a general election candidate, bypassing the committee he himself had created to shield him when harsh decisions about prospective candidates had to be taken.
The PN needs someone who can be perceived as electable
He was definitely a liability when he burdened the PN with a coalition that only served to widen the gap between the PL and the PN with the result that the PN ended up with one seat less in Parliament.
Zooming in to the electoral campaign, I met several people who said that Busuttil rose to the occasion.  I beg to differ.  The PN was in a better position on May 1 than it ended up in on June 3.  During the electoral campaign the PN lost support and the gap between the PL and the PN widened.  Since when losing support is being perceived as doing well?

Let us not forget that the PN was caught on the wrong foot when the election was announced, that there was no electoral manifesto ready, not even a draft and that the very few last minute proposals were half-baked.  Let us not forget that we were told that this election is not about proposals and we were asked to vote for the PN simply because the others are not good enough because they are corrupt.

Let us not forget that this was being fed to us at the same time as Busuttil, without being asked, had disclosed that his party was receiving illicit money from one of the biggest businessmen on the island.

Simon must go, because if he stays, he will pave the way to all the other PN officials to stay.  And then who will shoulder the responsibility of this devastating defeat?  They all have to.

They did the only honourable thing to do in the circumstances when they resigned, but now I am seeing signs of manoeuvres indicating that they want to get back to their seats.  Maybe they will consider playing some musical chairs but, given the slightest chance, most of them will jump back in.
Simon must go, because for those who want to see, there is an eye opener.  All this happened in 2003, exactly the same, with the only difference that the two main parties were in the opposite situation they are in today.  After losing the 2003 election, Alfred Sant resigned.  He reconsidered his position after an orchestrated chorus of requests which climaxed at the MLP mass meeting on May 1.
He stayed, only to do the impossible; he lost the 2008 election.  Alfred Sant resigned from party leader once and for all in 2008.  But the PL lost five years and that’s what the PN is risking to loose, five precious years.

Finally, Busuttil must go because the PN needs fresh ideas.  I still believe that the new PN leader should be someone from within the party.  Someone who will have the guts to rebrand the party, starting from the very basics, like its name and emblem.
Someone who can build a good team based on a mixture of experience and enthusiasm.  Someone who can reach out to traditional PN people who do not feel that they belong to the party anymore, who can build bridges with those who in the recent past formed part of the party and have left it for some reason or another.


The PN needs someone who can be perceived as electable.
This does not necessarily mean that the PN will win the next general election, but it will surely mean that the PN will be on the right track.  If the PN wants to stand a chance to win, then it must go for change.  On the other hand, if the PN is comfortable where it stands then it can opt for the status quo.  If I were to predict, I would say that the PN will choose the latter option, the status quo.  I really hope that I will be proven wrong.
Philip Mifsud is a former Nationalist Party member of Parliament.

----------------


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« Reply #226 on: June 19, 2017, 08:00:30 PM »

http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/national/78258/strickland_heir_pushes_for_release_of_files_its_an_unexploded_scandal_#.WUgN7-t97IU


 Strickland heir pushes for release of files: ‘It's an unexploded scandal’
The sole heir of the late Mabel Strickland is demanding that Mario de Marco and Max Ganado release key documents pertaining to his aunt's will
tim_diaconoTim Diacono 19 June 2017, 7:32pmPrint Version
0
 Robert Hornyold-Strickland will be back in court this week
Robert Hornyold-Strickland will be back in court this week
 

The sole heir of the late Allied Newspapers founder Mabel Strickland will be back in court this week, as he continues his quest for what he claims to be his rightful inheritance to his late-great aunt’s estate.
Robert Hornyold-Strickland, the second largest shareholder in Allied, which publishes the Times of Malta, said in a statement that the issue is possible “the biggest unexploded scandal” concerning the Nationalist Party – a reference to outgoing PN deputy leader Mario de Marco.
Hornyold-Strickland is claiming that his late aunt’s was changed in 1979, while he was living in England, by her testamentary executors – the late Prof. Guido de Marco and Prof. Joseph Ganado.
He is now engaged in a court battle with their sons –leader Mario de Marco and Ganado Advocates partner Max Ganado – to release files relating to the Strickland Foundation, which he says will prove that his aunt had intended him to be the rightful owner of the Foundation’s 78% shareholding in Allied Newspapers.
The Strickland Foundation has refused to release the files, warning that it would “create a dangerous precedent if it were made to reveal files relating to deceased lawyers”.
“The result of the elections shows that the Maltese voters were more concerned with the issues of the country’s economic stability than over allegations of corruption by the Government,” Hornyold-Strickland said. “Many Maltese voters have also not forgotten that the reason the Nationalist Government was ousted in 2013 was because of serious allegations of corruption by some members of their administration.”
“Possibly the biggest unexploded scandal still relates to the issues that I am seeking justice on regarding the Executors’ maladministration of my great-aunt’s estate and their distribution of her Strickland legacies.
“Hence, I am demanding to have access to all my great-aunt’s legal and administrative files, which have been withheld from me for 28 years.”
He said that Mabel Strickland had been trying to protect Allied for  “herself and her heirs in perpetuity” because she was determined its newspapers would remain independent and free of political interference.
He is also contending that the breach of fiduciary duties, by the erstwhile executors, has resulted in the diversion of over €30 million of assets to the Strickland Foundation.
“The Foundation is now controlled, not by Mabel’s family, but by this ‘clique’ that includes Dr de Marco, who, as a PEP, should not have such direct influence on Malta’s leading English language newspapers,” Hornyold-Strickland said. “The Foundation has also been in receipt of €3 million of improper dividends from Allied Newspapers at the expense of the estate. Strickland maintains this is never what his great-aunt intended.”
Following the deaths of the two original Executors, the Courts have appointed Horny-old Strickland to complete all remaining executor’s duties.
However, he said that he is unable to complete such duties in the absence of the files he is demanding access to.
“I am looking to the Courts to see that full and proper disclosure of all this documentation is made available, since I believe they will shed light on my great-aunt’s intentions and clarify the conflicts in her final will,” he said.
“Until I am given proper access to all my great-aunt’s legal and administrative files by this clique of people, who have breached their fiduciary duties, we will never know the truth. So obviously I am hopeful that this week all these files will be released.”
 



 View Posts 199-202

This whole affair STINKS.




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« Reply #227 on: July 14, 2017, 03:33:08 PM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170714/letters/Respect-borders.653210


 Friday, July 14, 2017, 00:01 by James Marples, Texas, USA
Respect borders


I read the article ‘Austria to control Italy border” (July 4).
The article noted that armoured vehicles are being sent to block the unending flow of migrants across the border from Italy into Austria. I support Austria (or any other country, for that matter) for protecting its sovereign borders.
People holding a certain nationality or a valid visa are free to travel within a country but their rights must stop at each nation’s boundary-line.
While I sympathise with the economic plight of migrants fleeing to supposedly start anew life, I do not support illegal entry into another country or group of countries.
We, in the US, face the same problem Austria is confronted with. Many people are waiting to apply for legal citizenship and we have migrants who cheat the system. I fully support legal means and obeying existing rules and regulations.
Also, the ‘recipient’ country must be economically able to support an influx of legal immigrants. Many migrants are able-bodied people who simply are transients and those who remain illegally often would not assimilate.
Turning huge masses of people away by means of armoured vehicles may be the only way to prevent a country from being a parasite.
Where will it end up if it is not stopped? It would possibly lead to a revolution and chaos.
While it may seem heartless, no country can tolerate its sovereign borders being ignored or invaded. Each country has a duty to protect its native citizens, their national identity, their national treasury and protect what is theirs.
Respect for law and order is the only way to maintain a civilised way of life for all.

----------


 A letter exuding common sense.
And yet, read the Liberal comments oozing sarcasm and sophistry to denigrate perfectly sound policies.
Liberalism is a disease of the mind.



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« Reply #228 on: July 16, 2017, 08:20:22 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170716/letters/Let-us-put-this-righteous-anger-aside.653360

The stupidest letter to the Times, this year.


Sunday, July 16, 2017, 00:01 by Louisa Grech, Attard
Let us put this righteous anger aside


Every human being is created in the image and likeness of God.  And that applies to every human be­ing, whether a man or woman, heterosexual or gay, intellectually or physically disabled, coloured or white, sinner or saint, religious or atheist, and the list goes on and on.
God in His infinite goodness, His unconditional love and His bound­less mercy, makes no distinction and gives of Himself freely to all.  We are the ones who put up the barriers, who refuse to listen to His living word, who refuse to obey His commandment: “Love each other as I have loved you.”
He loves. Irrespective of our beliefs or even our way of life. He chooses to love us and to wait for us to recognise our need of Him in our lives. He does not judge us. As a loving Father, He embraces us and welcomes us into His loving arms. No distinction is made. We are the ones who make distinctions, who put labels on people because we are continuously judging them, continuously putting ourselves in a position of righteousness, a righteousness that looks at the straw in people’s eyes but not the beam in our own eyes.
Why can’t we learn that each and every human being, in his or her search for love in other human beings, will eventually encounter and recognise the love of this wondrous God who created all life, in all its diversity and in all its beauty, but even in its state of becoming, with all the challenges and suffering that this presents. Have you ever stopped to consider that He might actually be testing our capacity to love unconditionally, just as He loves us?
As a nation, and as a Catholic nation, we should recognise that we need to look far beyond our prejudices and judgments. We need to look at the heart of the matter; we need to touch and feel the untold suffering of those whom we are constantly excluding and even condemning.
We need to empathise and recognise that many situations are ex­treme­ly difficult and challenging, and if we have not experienced anything of the kind, we should really keep silent and pray, because, but for the grace of God, go I.
So please, let us put this righteous anger aside and recognise that the change of the words in the Marriage Act are, really and truly, not that much of a life changer, because it is actually how we each stand before God that makes the difference to marriage and not an act of law.
0

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« Reply #229 on: August 13, 2017, 09:32:20 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20170813/editorial/stemming-economic-migration.655501


 Sunday, August 13, 2017, 07:38
Stemming economic migration

For the last three years, Italy has borne the brunt of the migration crisis as the central Mediterranean route into Europe has become the chief entry path into the EU. More than 83,000 migrants arrived in southern Italy in the first half of this year, an increase of 19 per cent on the first six months of last year. Over 2,300 have died on the crossing in 2017, after more than 4,000 last year.

The use of Italian ports has become a touchy subject with Italian voters. The Italian government, which faces an election early next year – with the populist Beppo Grillo’s 5-Star party currently in the lead – has adopted a tough approach to migrant boats.
Helpfully, Libya’s Prime Minister, who is the head of the UN-backed unity government, has asked Italy to send its navy to help the Libyan coastguard pick up migrants within Libya’s 12-mile territorial waters and take them back to shore.

Italy’s tough policy shift has led to a number of repercussions. One incident involved a standoff between Italy and Malta. A charity vessel, the Golfo Azzurro, was refused entry by the Italian government to allow three rescued migrants to disembark in Lampedusa. The ship was re-directed to Malta, but the Maltese authorities refused it entry on the solid grounds under international law that people rescued at sea should disembark at the closest safe port of call.
The Maltese government was absolutely within its rights to adhere to that principle for fear of setting an important precedent.
But there are broader issues at stake. Before Italy’s recent agreement with Libya, the majority of migrants would sail from Libyan ports into international waters to be rescued by charity boats or the Italian coastguard. Critics have accused the rescue NGOs of operating a “taxi service” for migrants.

The people-traffickers’ ploy had been to deliver migrants not to Italy, but just outside the boundary of Libya’s territorial waters so they could be rescued by NGO charity boats beyond. Though there can be absolutely no doubt that the charities were – and are – motivated by noble intentions, they were in effect inadvertently aiding the traffickers.

The deal just reached with Libya makes it very difficult for people-smugglers to operate, and is an important element of EU policy. But by teaming up with the Libyans, Italy is facing accusations of helping their coastguard to force migrants back into camps where rape, torture and slavery are commonplace.
Turning back the boats in Libya’s territorial waters may carry risks in the short term, but Italy has recognised this in its plans to establish proper refugee camps in Libya. It must now press ahead with these urgently to ensure that the Italian intervention inside Libyan waters does not exacerbate an already bad humanitarian situation.

As Bill Gates – definitely not a hard-liner on migration – has said: “Europe must make it more difficult for Africans to reach the continent [of Europe] via the current transit routes.” The top three countries of origin of those arriving in Italy in the first quarter of this year were Nigeria, Bangladesh and Guinea.

 UN figures suggest that 70 per cent of those who have arrived in Libya were escaping poverty.

Unless and until the central Mediterranean is viewed by economic migrants as a cul de sac, the numbers will continue to increase along with the profits for the people-traffickers.

Long term, the most benevolent and sensible strategy is to improve life in the poorest countries and so weaken the desire to migrate. But this is work which will take decades. It is in Europe’s – and overwhelmingly in Malta’s – self-interest that this surge into Europe from poorer nations is held at bay.

For the sake of Europe and the developing world from which they leave (which is losing a swathe of their young and enterprising citizens) realpolitik demands a much firmer line must be drawn.

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 One reads in disbelieve this piece of sanity from the zio-ToM.
I had to check whether I was reading the right newspaper.
A step in the right direction.



00508
The Golden Dawn
Imperium
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Boycott The Times and The Sunday Times.
Do not post there, do not buy a copy of either, do not advertise.
Hurt Them in the only way they understand.

BOYCOTT THE TIMES
 Imperium 1107

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