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IMPERIUM
Norman Lowell
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« on: January 03, 2013, 10:52:29 AM »

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20130103/local/university-study-finds-malta-s-hidden-landscape.451750

Thursday, January 3, 2013, 09:27
University study finds Malta's hidden landscape

Maps of the Maltese Islands today and 20,000 years ago.

    Maps of the Maltese Islands today and 20,000 years ago.   
    Reconstructed images of a 270 metre wide cave located offshore Marfa and a valley east of Comino.   

Marine scientists have discovered an exceptionally well-preserved terrestrial landscape submerged in the coastal waters of the Maltese Islands, which reveals how the archipelago would have looked like 20,000 years ago.

At this time, Europe was experiencing the last ice age and sea level in the Mediterranean Sea was 130 metres lower than at present.

Malta, Gozo and Comino were connected and the archipelago was two and a half times larger than it is today.

Dingli Cliffs towered 380m above sea level whilst Valletta was located 10km inshore.

The coastline from Marsalforn to Pembroke consisted of steep coastal cliffs that were incised by more than 20 valleys.

Numerous limestone plateaus hosted collapsed caves and featured landslides along their margins.

A 40 km wide land bridge connected southeast Malta all the way to the south of Sicily.

Sea level rise during the last 20,000 years has drowned 450 km2 of this landscape, meaning that the largest part of the Maltese Islands is today under water.
Several parts of this submerged landscape, such as caves and valleys, could have provided ideal sites for preserving evidence of prehistoric human occupation or animal activity. Further investigations may thus shed light on the origin of the Maltese megalithic society and animal migration routes to sites such as Ghar Dalam.

Moreover, submerged landscapes also comprise archives of past changes in climate and sea level, and their study will be crucial for predicting future climate change and its impact on the Maltese Islands.

The study also identifies which areas of the Maltese coastal waters constitute a hazard to seafloor infrastructure, deserve protection from human activities, or provide attractions to divers, thus contributing valuable information to marine spatial planners.

This study was led by Aaron Micallef from the University of Malta and forms part of Mapscape, a project involving CNR-ISMAR, National Oceanography Centre, CNR-IRPI and University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.

-----------------------

From IMPERIUM EUROPA: The Book that Changed the World

Melita - Spiritual Centre
« Last Edit: January 03, 2013, 11:42:03 AM by IMPERIUM » Report to moderator   Logged
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2013, 07:23:49 PM »

A WANTED ISLAND!
A TRUE FOCAL POINT!
A SACRED ISLAND!


IF MALTA WAS NOT ATLANTIS! IT WAS OF EQUAL PRESTIGE!
 
AVE MELITA!
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2015, 01:13:55 PM »

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20150605/local/maltas-underwater-caves-to-be-explored-in-two-month-expedition.571203

 Friday, June 5, 2015, 12:22
Malta's underwater caves to be explored in two-month expedition



Oceana has launched a two-month expedition to survey deep sea areas and underwater caves in Malta.

The at-sea campaign, included within the Life Bahar for N2K project, will garner documentation on marine habitats and species so that new sites of community importance could be protected under the Natura 2000 network. Many of these areas will be researched for the first time ever.

The project is co-financed by the EU Life + funding programme and led by the Malta Environment and Planning Authority, in collaboration with the Ministry for Sustainable Development, the Environment and Climate Change, the Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, the University of Malta and Fundación Oceana.

Important marine habitats will be surveyed in selected areas between the Maltese coastline and the 25 nautical mile boundary and down to depths of 1,000m below sea level.

Research and surveys will be carried out onboard the research catamaran Oceana Ranger using an ROV which reaches depths of up to 1,000 metres recording in full HD.

Marine scientists onboard the Ranger will prioritise the research of reefs, sandbanks and submarine caves, as these marine features must be protected under the Habitats Directive. Video, photos and seabed samples will be taken to ensure a better understanding of the areas surveyed.

Life Bahar for N2K is the second LIFE+ project partnered by Oceana. Earlier this year, Life + Indemares concluded in Spain, resulting in 73,000 sqkm included under Natura 2000 network.

Oceana was responsible for researching a seamount with similar technology as that to be used in Malta, and contributed information on some of the surveyed areas within the project.

The Natura 2000 is a network of protected areas throughout the EU and considered the largest coherent group of protected areas in the world.

The Natura 2000 network was established in 1992 under the Habitats Directive, with the long term aim of protecting Europe’s most vulnerable and threatened species and habitats.

www.lifebahar.org.mt

---------------


This survey could turn up more than the explorers hope for.
An insight to an undersea/underground, archeological treasure, dating back thousands of years.
A Paradise lost in the deluvian cataclysm that changed the whole of the Mediterranean basin.



00306
The Golden Dawn
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 11:31:47 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20171122/letters/Neolithic-past.663736


Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 00:01 by Bernard Vassallo, Swieqi
Neolithic past


Our islands feature almost 30 temples, above and below ground, of the late Stone Age, exhibiting huge or large stones or megaliths. We do not only have Ħaġar Qim, Mnajdra (picture) and the Tarxien Temples.
Many have been lost with the passing of time. And others risk being lost through recent and modern ‘development’. A case in point is It-Tumbata, just outside Luqa, where under or adjoining the modern reservoir a few ancient finds remain to be seen today. This was a site of major importance when it was first discovered.
David Trump expressed his view that no other territory in North Africa or in Europe, even, significantly, in neighbouring Sicily, exhibits  such a large amount of prehistoric megalithic remains. These were mainly very ancient sanctuaries or temples, which functioned in the past as religious and civic hubs to an evolved people in our distant past.
Sicily’s lack of late Neolithic temples is curious. This places Malta and Gozo in a unique context. And our two main islands could indeed qualify uniquely as ‘sacred islands’.
In schools in Greece, pupils study a specific subject known as ApXaia, pronounced Arhéa, meaning ancient history, of which their country offers countless sites and features, which the people are so proud of.
I understand that in Malta and Gozo’s schools this subject of ancient history is until now partly included in our pupils’ history curriculum. But is this enough? Given our wealth of prehistoric remains, maybe this subject could become more specific and focused and become even a separate subject. This would enhance awareness of our unique past among our rising generations.
A most readable and concise recent publication with text by Anthony Bonanno and excellent photography and design by Daniel Cilia, is now on our bookshelves. It is an important aid to clarifying and expanding on our knowledge of our Neolithic past. It is entitled The archaeology of Malta and Gozo – 5000 BC-AD 1091.
I feel it is worth using it as a learning tool in our schools and at the University.
Sufficient awareness of our Neolithic past can, in my opinion, be further enhanced.


---------------


See previous posts.



00511
The Golden Dawn
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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2017, 09:46:19 AM »

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20171211/letters/Filfla-Prehistoric-islet.665386


Monday, December 11, 2017, 06:05 by Bernard Vassallo, Swieqi
Filfla ­– Prehistoric islet

In our islands’ prehistory, finds were apparently not restricted to our main islands of Malta and Gozo, and marginally to Comino, but also to our islet of Filfla (Pepper Island?)

Filfla island is claimed to have had Copper Age and Bronze Age sherds, a few of which are dubiously said to be preserved in the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta. Grid reference 467605 (Evans 1971). Bronze Age, or later cart ruts were reported by Fr Emmanuel Magri as existing on Filfla until the end of the 19th century. (Teuma 2003).

“Temple period remains have also been found on the islet, probably belonging to a sailor’s shrine. These include pottery, jars and bones of animals. Whether it was inhabited or just visited is however still an open discussion…” (Farrugia Randon 2006:43).

Sir Themistocles Zammit reported finds of Temple Period pottery on Filfla in the20th century.

Next to, and west of Filfla, across a narrow channel, lie the large rock of Ix-Xutu l-Kbir, also known as Il-Blata ta’ Santa Marija; and the reef of Ix-Xutu ż-Żgħir which barely reaches above sea level, all surrounded  by deep sea.

The submerged reef of Stork Rock lies 700 metres to the south of Filfla islet. It is a relatively remote hazard to navigation. Marine surveys were conducted on Stork Rock in bygone years.

Filfla and its adjacent rocks do not normally figure on recent maps of Malta.

Oil platforms or ship rigs often anchor nowadays in or near the Congreve Channel.

Filfla islet, lying south of Malta, is visible from Għar Ħasan, Wied iż-Żurrieq and its Blue Grotto, Għar Lapsi, Ġebel Ciantar and Il-Wardija ta’ San Ġorg above Fawwara, and Dingli Cliffs. In fine weather, it is also visible from southwest Gozo at Ta’ Sarraflu cliffs, lying some 20 miles away.

If tiny Filfla has indeed offered the prehistoric remains claimed above, one can just imagine how much more material has been, and still is present, in Gozo and Malta. Some waiting to be discovered or rediscovered.

Our islands’ prehistory underlies our more recent culture and history.

------------

80% of the Maltese are a low quality Population - this is due primarily to our Arabic language; Ic-Cuqlajta.
This section of the population do not deserve to be living on this Sacred Island.
Their abject greed has destroyed it - it is now a jungle of bricks, flats and garages.



00512
The Golden Dawn
Imperium
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